Oct 212008
 

I just got around to watching Friday’s webinar by Optaros about Alfresco in the media industry.  In it, Bob Fitzpatrick highlights three major points regarding how to increase online revenues:

  • Increase user engagement with your content
  • Extend the reach of your content
  • Enable API access to your content

As a prerequisite though, companies should be converting their content into assets that can be managed centrally.  In so doing, content can be easily related to other content and then be syndicated, retrieved by third parties, or composed and presented to users.

In addition to the aforementioned strategic goals, companies should strive to deliver on them in an efficient manner.  According to Bryan Spaulding, this means building a system with a Media Service Architecture that scales and enables exposure to PCs, mobile devices, and TVs.  And don’t forget to instrument your system such that feedback can be obtained to enable reporting and thus tweaking of the platform.  Jeff Potts reminds us that Alfresco and Optaros can be levaraged to get you there faster via their awesome capabilities.

What is interesting to me about all this is the different approach to the problem.  At Ringside Networks, we focused on the “beefy middle”, as Shaun Connolly so eloquently put it.  In a nutshell, this meant enabling social interactions in the context of existing web sites with existing users and content.  Restated in terms of a Ringside customer’s objectives, those three goals might look like this:

  • Increase user engagement with your web site
  • Increase the reach of your company/brand
  • Enable API access to your site’s social capabilities and/or users

In the Alfresco/Optaros case, the underlying premise is that content is of the utmost importance, and that people will pay to enable their users to interact with your content, or better yet to advertise around your content.  In the case of Ringside, it was all about identity and interaction on your site amongst your users, with new eyes sourced from various social networks.  SocialPass is taking yet another approach, which brings people to your site, regardless of where they came from.  Either way, people would pay to bring users to their web sites.

I think the best of both worlds can be achieved.  There will be some shops that won’t be positioned to re-architect their content management systems, and will pay to bring new users to them.  Hopefully their advertising revenue will more than offset the costs of customer acquisition.  Other shops will be well positioned to capitalize on their content via a solid Media Service architecture.  Finally, there will be shops that do both.  I can imagine the NY Times online syndicating images, videos, and stories, providing API access, and serving photo galleries and videos along side related stories with personalized SocialPass conversations involving Facebook users, MySpace users, E-Mail invitees, and Twitter invitees all on the same page with integrated ratings and persistent commentsThis is nirvana!!!

  2 Responses to “The King of Social Media: Content or Identity?”

  1. Your points re: increase user engagement, extend reach, and enable API access are good, but wrapping them within the business drivers (i.e. the why) is helpful. Why do these things? Well, if you are a business, it is ultimately to acquire more customers at lower cost. Content and indentity are important pieces of the equation.

    I wrote a post that covers these points in more detail.
    “What Is Inbound Marketing? A Great Path To 0 and 100!”
    http://tinyurl.com/496oex

    Good content helps people determine if they are a prospect (or not) for what you have to offer. Leveraging social media techniques can help people find your content and opt-in to what you’re selling, if they’re interested….which is more efficient for both the consumer AND the business.

  2. I believe everything published was actually very logical. However, consider this, suppose you added a little content? I mean, I don’t wish to tell you how to run your website, but what if you added a post title to maybe get people’s attention? I mean %BLOG_TITLE% is kinda boring. You should look at Yahoo’s home page and watch how they write post titles to get people to click. You might add a video or a pic or two to grab readers excited about everything’ve got to say. Just my opinion, it would bring your blog a little livelier.|

 Leave a Reply

(required)

(required)

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>